Conceptual Options Surrogacy Agency News: U.S. Immigration Policy Catches Up with Assisted Reproductive Technology

Conceptual Options Surrogacy Agency News: U.S. Immigration Policy Catches Up with Assisted Reproductive Technology

According to the National Law Review, the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) issued a new policy today clarifying the definition of “mother” and “parent” under the Immigration and Nationality Act, to include a gestational mother who (a) gave birth to the child and (b) was the child’s legal mother at the time of birth under the law of the jurisdiction where the child was born.  However, the author of the article did give the warning below:

U.S. citizens who are considering a foreign surrogacy arrangement should carefully review the laws of the country in which the birth will take place to understand whether under local law the surrogate mother will be considered to be the legal mother of the child born through ART.  If the law of the place of birth gives a contracted surrogate any parental rights, it could raise questions about the child’s legal mother and in turn, the child’s citizenship.

Otherwise, mothers who meet the expanded definition but don’t have a genetic relationship with their child (because they became pregnant through an egg donor) will be able to petition for their child; will be eligible to have their child petition for them based on their relationship, and will be able to transmit U.S. citizenship, if they are U.S. citizens and if the other relevant requirements for transmission of U.S. citizenship requirements are met.

This is great news for U.S. citizens who have given birth abroad (whether themselves or via a gestational surrogate) and have no genetic connection to their child.

Read more here about U.S. Immigration Policy Catches Up with Assisted Reproductive Technology.

Conceptual Options U.S. Immigration Policy Updated

Conceptual Options U.S. Immigration Policy Updated